@alec hmm... how big is the potential? Most CCS tech turns atmospheric carbon into carbon products that then have to be turned into other things or sequestered

@vgr
I can not give you numbers right now as it has been a while since was looking into proper papers (and lacking a )

But the idea is to capture the carbon not as a product but directly in the soil as Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) which is essentially that dark brown sticky part that you will find in healthy soil but not in depleted monoculture soil that you see on the side of the highway. Basically sugar like structures similar to brown coal at the end of a composting process.

@vgr
The estimates you will hear from True Believers are really really high, with the added benefit of higher yield, resiliency against floods, bio diversity etc.

This all is achieved by regenerative agriculture techniques like no-tilling, mulching and multi-corp planting.

Not very industry friendly at the moments, but I have this vague vision for robotized regenerative agriculture.

@alec richsoil.com/hugelkultur/ I hear that with this method you can not only use up firehazard deadwood from forests but capture enough seasonal snow melt/rainfall to reduce/eliminate irrigation needs on marginal land. You can make terraces to combat hillside erosion, or on level ground you can make labyrinths for fun.

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