«non-compositionality is a barrier to scientific understanding, because it breaks the reductionist methodology of always dividing a system into smaller components and translating explanations into lower levels.»

«compositionality is strictly necessary for working at scale. In a non-compositional setting, a technique for a solving a problem may be of no use whatsoever for solving the problem one order of magnitude larger»

«compositionality is not just the ability to compose objects, but the ability to work with an object after intentionally forgetting how it was built»

«… the opposite of compositionality is emergent effects. The common definition of emergence is a system being ‘more than the sum of its parts’, and so it is easy to see that such a system cannot be understood only in terms of its parts, i.e. it is not compositional.»

julesh.com/2017/04/22/on-compo

«Saudi government recently granted citizenship to a female robot. That robot has been able to do things in public that Saudi women, actual human ones, are forbidden from doing. And that's a great example of what happens when you don't believe in real people»

logicmag.io/05-everybodys-brai

Gauss, the greatest mathematician since antiquity, was born in poverty to a father who held menial jobs such as gardener and street butcher, and to a barely literate mother.

«... [A video] celebrating Ward Bennett, the polymath behind the furniture, interiors, and objects that have come to define a certain late-twentieth-century modernist sophistication.»

vimeo.com/246855180

"Right now over 50% of the world’s population live in cities. For this part of the population, everything around them has been designed, from the contact lens, to the cloth, the chair, the room, the house, the street, the park, the city. These designed surroundings play exactly the same role for a city dweller as nature does for an indigenous person living in a rain forest. They can be designed well or badly. They will make a difference."

bmw.com/en/design/sagmeister-d

In Georgian England, George Cheyne, the leading doctor, had to be wedged in and out of his carriage by his servants when he soared to four hundred pounds, while a little later Erasmus Darwin, grandfather of Charles and another important physician, had a semicircle cut out of his dining table to accommodate his paunch.

Milk, suspected of spreading scarlet fever, typhoid, and diphtheria as well as tuberculosis, was sensibly avoided well into the twentieth century when the United States and many parts of Europe introduced stringent regulations. My mother sifted weevils from the flour bin; my aunt reckoned that if the maggots could eat her home-cured ham and survive, so could the family.

Certainly, many of our forebears were drunk much of the time, given that beer or wine were preferred to water, and with good reason. In the cities, polluted water supplies brought intestinal diseases in their wake. In France, for example, no piped water was available until the 1860s.

Some historians argue that bread made from moldy, verminous flour, or adulterated with mash, leaves, or bark to make it go further, or contaminated with hemp or poppy seeds to drown out sorrows, meant that for five hundred years Europe’s poor staggered around in a drugged haze subject to hallucinations.

Joe says “I have these guys on my coach every week. I’m trying to help them live with this problem and here I am screaming at this guy. It’s horrible!” Then they turn to the economist and say “Fred, what do you think?”

Fred says “I think that this situation is totally inefficient. This guy should play at night!

So these guys get very upset and they start to shout and say “Come on, can we play through please! You can’t waste all of our afternoon!” They sent the priest up to find out what was going on and he came back absolutely crestfallen and said “You know why that poor guy is laying so slowly? It’s because he’s blind. I’m so upset because every Sunday I’m preaching to people to be nice to others.” He turns to his psychoanalyst friend and say’s “Joe, what do you think?”

1/ There were three people playing golf; a priest, a psychoanalyst, and an economist. The got very upset because the guy in front was playing extremely slowly and he had a caddy to help him.

Youtube's new feature: video seeking with a double tap on the screen sides makes it a little more scannable. Feels like the UX needs a little more innovation.

An apt description of why I dislike video learning content

«For infovores, text, in contrast to photos or videos or music, is the medium of choice from a velocity standpoint. [Text,] unlike other mediums which unfold at their own pace (this is especially the case with video, which infovores hate for its low scannability).»

This is an interesting backstory of Amazon Prime.

«People hate paying for shipping. They despise it. It may sound banal, even self-evident, but understanding that was, I'm convinced, so critical to much of how we unlocked growth at Amazon over the years.»

eugenewei.com/blog/2018/5/21/i

Wish I had saved all my scribbles 🤔

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