OK, this is my favorite thing SlateStarCodex has ever done: slatestarcodex.com/2019/03/04/

presenting true facts like they're insane conspiracy theories. what if Obama... ISN'T FROM AFRICA AT ALL? what if the GOVERNMENT had a SECRET RESEARCH PROGRAM to reach THE MOON in the 1960s?

The show how 1. any information is more appealing when presented as SECRETS THEY DON'T WANT YOU TO KNOW and also 2. a lot of true facts about the world are pretty weird.

The red MSpaint arrows are a nice touch.

Flux ( justgetflux.com/ ) is an add-on that changes the color balance of your computer screen at night so you're not kept awake by the subconscious effect of bright white light). I highly recommend it.

Unfortunately there's a bug in the video drivers of Mac OS 10.13.6 that makes Flux not work right anymore.

The silver lining is that the bug causes black pixels to turn bright blue or cyan, which creates interesting accidental artwork like this:

Somebody tell the Honey Nut Cheerios bee that he's a little too late to jump on the cryptocurrency ICO bandwagon

I read Curious George books to my daughter a lot so I notice things about the artwork.

In the original 1941 book, the style of architecture is very French (below). But from "Curious George Takes a Job" on, the city is very obviously New York. It made me curious: George hasn't traveled in-story, so why the change?

It turns out ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._A._Re ) that Margaret and H.A. Rey (both German Jews) wrote book 1 in Paris, then took the manuscript with them when they fled the Nazis to NYC. 😲

Europe's coastline if the polar ice caps melt completely. Good news, Russia: you finally get all the warm-water ports you could ever want!

(the political borders on here are dumb, though. they're both too speculative and not nearly speculative enough. Who says the survivors of melted-ice-cap-world are even organized into nation states?)

from ecoclimax.com/2017/06/politica

Edo-period woodblock print of George Washington fighting a tiger.

From Osanaetoki Bankokubanashi, a hilariously inaccurate history book for children published in 1861 in Japan.

(You can tell he's Washington because the kanji in the little box to his left spell out wa-shin-tou phonetically)

The policy of sakoku (closed country) was still in effect in 1861 so accurate info about the outside world would have been hard to come by. More at soranews24.com/2018/11/16/edo-

A WIP cover for my comic "Yuki Hoshigawa in Hacker Utopia".

(front cover on the right, back-cover blurb on the left)

I'm going to use this as-is for a self-printed "ashcan" edition to sell at my local upcoming comics convention. After that I'll clean it up some, and do a real back-cover illustration, for the real print run.

Admitting we need to cancel the release and spend another sprint on this feature:

Hotfixing bugs as they are discovered on staging server:

Staging the new feature on a server where it encounters real user data for the first time:

Developing a new feature and unit testing it on small, idealized data set:

Last night my daughter found my book of early-1940s (riding a lion! so exciting!) and wanted to read it with me.

"OK so on this page Wonder Woman is disguising herself as an elephant to infiltrate the mob... now she's astrally projecting herself to the planet Mars... now she's being tied up by a Nazi lesbian dominatrix? now she's fighting, uh... a horde of extremely racist Yellow Peril caricatures??

Actually I don't think this comic is appropriate for your age at ALL."

Fave n.28: The Evil of the Daleks (2nd Doctor, season 4, 1967)

From the 1960s to a Victorian mad science lab to the dead planet Skaro, an alchemical quest to distill the Human Factor that will let the Daleks conquer the entire timeline.
What the Human Factor turns out to be, and what it does to the Daleks who inject it, is a profound statement of values.

(Unfortunately the video was lost by the BBC. The audio track survived and was edited into a sort of radio play with narration.)

Refactor Camp

Mastodon instance for attendees of Refactor Camp, and members of various online/offline groups that have grown out of it. Related local groups with varying levels of activity exist in the Bay Area, New York, Chicago, and Austin.

Kinda/sorta sponsored by the Ribbonfarm Blogamatic Universe.

If you already know a few people in this neck of the woods, try and pick a handle they'll recognize when you sign up. Please note that the registration confirmation email may end up in your spam folder, so check there. It should come from administrator Zach Faddis.