Zach Faddis is a user on refactorcamp.org. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse. If you don't, you can sign up here.

Zach Faddis @zacharius@refactorcamp.org

More and more lately I am being asked to tip at places that i wouldn't normally expect to . I feel no social obligation to spend extra when I'm not given any special service and have to wait in line. Am I wrong in this belief?

@vgr

I dunno, maybe I should look into it

Allow <= 10 minutes between you tooting with the hashtag and it being boosted by @RBU_RSS_BOT

feed fox hashtag capabilities officially and fully working.

anything locally tooted with the hashtag will be boosted by @RBU_RSS_BOT and appended to a local file for possible inclusion in ribbonfarm's weekly newsletter

@vgr

not sure where privacy and freedom from surveillance falls on this pyramid.

I'm imagining a maslow's hierarchy of internet freedom.

At the bottom is the ability to send and receive information.

Higher levels include freedom from firewalls and net neutrality.

The highest point I can think of at the moment is freedom from individual actors trying to astroturf or otherwise manipulate information environments.

US activists focus on higher level freedoms but globally most people are stuck on the bottom, hoping their gov doesn't shut off the internet this election seaso

Social Justic Fantasy Show more

Social Justic Fantasy Show more

Zach Faddis boosted

All my shit has been moved and my 1st radio preset key is set to the local NPR station.

I officially live in Austin.

Zach Faddis boosted

CAPITAL F, creative commons magazine about Free software

capitalf.org/issues/CapitalF-0

Bryan Lunduke just posted it on his Patreon. Cool project!

Talks about "The road to a free software phone", "Video production with free software", "The stigma of charging for free software", "a personal journey w/ free software" & "replacing Google w/ free software"

#purism #linux #opensource #foss #floss #google #capitalf #lunduke

Twitter is making it much harder to use their api from the last time I had need for it.

I have to apply for developer access which includes writing >= 300 words on what I plan on making with their api. As well as checking boxes about whether this will be used to share information with a government entity.

Not sure how I feel about this

pretty sure this could all be done over http, with a browser extension to handle the authentication on client end

- The biggest problem I see with this is not wanting to use unsecure computers because you would have to share your private key with that computer to log on, but the same could be said for passwords.

- convincing people to carry around a usb stick containing keys seems much easier than convincing them to choose and track dozens of hard to guess/bruteforcable passwords.

Why haven't asymmetrical keys replaced passwords yet?

imagined security scheme:
1.Generate public/private key pair
2. share public key when creating account with whomever.
3. when logging in, account will send you random string
4. your browser will encrypt string with private key
5. account will decrypt string with your public key, if it is the same string they sent, you are authenticated.

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to act solely in accordance with their local incentives.

I have gotten into to habit over the past year of keeping all change in my car and handing it out to panhandlers.

I was recently rebuffed for doing this while driving with a friend who said that a handful of change wasn't helping anybody and if I actually cared I'd give a couple dollars.

Is the marginal utility of coins so low that they aren't even valuable to the homeless anymore?

For arguments sake we will say that the average amount I hand out at a time is in the range of .30-1.50

3/

I always thought that if anyone I knew could be a cult leader it would be him and wondered if similar techniques were employed by people like Charles Mason and Bhagwan . It probably didn't help that whenever we met we were both usually quite stoned.