Recently had two people close to me lose loved ones. Not really sure how best to comfort them and I fear that I am not very good at showing compassion in general. I don't think I'm lacking in compassion but rather can't perform compassion believably.

Peak genius is designing systems and hacks to account for all the ways in which you're an idiot.

For Christmas/New Year I have decided to pay off the last of my student debt. I was on track to pay it off in the next several months but I decided to dip into savings a bit and vanquish then before the new year.

All of my roommate situations have been with strangers. Either through Craigslist or student apartments. The experience has been extremely positive. I'd say 1 out 9 was truly a bad experience. While others definitely had their challenges, they all enriched my life.

My ignorance of exercise science and of machine learning tools is too great to know whether this could be a useful tool or how technically feasible this is. But I think it's a cool idea nonetheless.

An even more advanced version would be some kind of neural net/machine learning tool that used an immense data set of workouts to determine how much stress you should be subjected to that day depending on demographics and previous workouts.

An even more complex version could have macro and micro fluxuations, but always trending upwards and anchored by what you reported you can currently do. This still probably wouldn't be great simply because of the difference in how much stress ppl can take.

My intuition tells me the same is true for human strength. Imagine if you had a program where you entered your 5 rep max for squat. And every day it gave you a weight to try and lift which was within a range of +/- 10% of what you could currently do

Progressive overload is great and all, but if you were trying to create the strongest tree possible you wouldn't subject it to slightly stronger wind each day. You would give it seasons of strong winds followed by seasons of calm. With lots of random variation throughout.

The story has been percolating in my head, along with alot of @nntaleb@twitter.com's ideas about randomness from his books.

I have this vague idea about somehow applying this to strength training. Like creating a stochastic algorithm to tell you how hard to push yourself daily.

I learned today about how in an experiment of trying to create a closed loop ecosystem, it was discovered that the trees couldn't grow strong enough to support themselves in the absence of wind. They needed the randomness and stressors caused by wind to grow strong.

I don't intend on dying anytime soon, or ever really. But if I do die in the next several years there are a handful of intersections where it will most likely occur. Most likely culprits include:

- 4th and I-35
- Springdale and Govalle
- 12th and Navasota

Favourite is probably Texas Eagle by Steve Earle and the Del McCoury Band

Will be riding the Texas Eagle from Austin to San Antonio today. Super excited as I haven't been ridin since childhood.

Made a trains playlist to listen to while traveling If anyone is interested.

open.spotify.com/playlist/0fIY

Dentistry is the most natural career path for sadists. I'm just glad they have a socially acceptable, productive outlet to put their dark energies toward.

This was empathy expanding for me and helped me better understand several previous discussions I've had.

He generally agreed but pointed out that there are many people who feel like much of what they built there identify around had been taken away and their culture was the only thing they had left.

By denying them that I was also dismissing that anything had been taken away.

Recently was having a discussion with a friend about cultural appropriation and how wrongheaded I thought the whole concept was.

Its common for people to be correct that they are being harmed but incorrect about the cause.

Often when we dismiss the cause we are implicitly dismissing that they are being harmed at all.

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Refactor Camp

Mastodon instance for attendees of Refactor Camp, and members of various online/offline groups that have grown out of it. Related local groups with varying levels of activity exist in the Bay Area, New York, Chicago, and Austin.

Kinda/sorta sponsored by the Ribbonfarm Blogamatic Universe.

If you already know a few people in this neck of the woods, try and pick a handle they'll recognize when you sign up. Please note that the registration confirmation email may end up in your spam folder, so check there. It should come from administrator Zach Faddis.